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Saturday, November 1, 2014

Mulligatawny - Away A While Recipe Favorites



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...Mulligatawny is an English version of an Indian soup that is usually made with curry and a small amount of chicken. The name literally means "pepper water". Although Bob and I had many soups while we were in India, we were never served this one, and, to my great embarrassment, I had never made it. Several weeks ago, I was introduced to the cooking of Madhur Jaffrey and her recipe for the soup caught my attention. I promised myself to try it once the activity in my kitchen moved from mazurka to waltz time and that opportunity presented itself last night. I was so excited about the results that I almost bumped my scheduled post. I stopped only because I wanted to see how this soup aged. I had it again for lunch today and I'm really happy to report my socks are still going up and down. This recipe is a treasure, especially for those who like food with a little bite. The predominant flavors here are garlic and ginger but they are perfectly balanced and neither will overwhelm the palate. I know the recipe looks involved but better than half the ingredients are spices and the soup is really easy to make. I have made very few changes to the original version. I did find the soup to be very thin, so I doubled the amount of potatoes used to thicken it and I used chicken thighs rather than the breast called for in the original recipe. I served the soup with rice for those who wanted something a bit more substantial. I really hope you will try this. I found it to be extraordinary and it will appear often on my table. The recipe can be found here.

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                   One Year Ago Today:                                                             Two Years Ago Today:
              Finnish Macaroni Casserole                                        Andean Day of the Dead Bread Babies


                Three Years Ago Today:                                                         Four Years Ago Today: 
            Menemen - Breakfast in Istanbul                                           Chocolate Zucchini Bread

Friday, October 31, 2014

Cranberry Bread Pudding with Orange Hard Sauce - Away A While Recipe Favorites



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...I'm probably a member of the last generation raised in kitchens where nothing was wasted, including stale bread and leftover rice. Rice and bread puddings were fixtures of my childhood. Bread pudding, both sweet and savory, has a long history in the annals of cooking. It can be traced to peasant kitchens where frugal and often hungry cooks refused to discard stale bread. The earliest recipe for bread pudding can be traced to a book called "The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy" by Hannah Glasse. It was published in 1747. Her recipe, save for instructions written in old English, is quite similar to those in use today. She adds butter, eggs and milk to stale bread and steams (boils) her pudding to completion. I prefer to bake mine.

I have a sentimental attachment to Cranberry Bread Pudding. It is, of course, delicious, but it's also one of the first recipes I entered into amateur recipe competition. It didn't embarrass me and it's stood the test of time. I make the pudding several times a year and it has become a fixture on my holiday dinner table. While the original recipe was made with croissants, and  I do, by the way, urge you to use them, other sweet breads can be used as a substitute. The pudding shown in today's post was made with a raisin sweet bread because that is what I had on hand. Pumpkin pie spice is used to keep the number of ingredients used in the recipe under control. That's important in competition recipes, but less so in the confines of your own kitchen. I'm inserting a list of spices within the recipe that can be used in case you don't keep pumpkin pie spice in your pantry. This pudding is packed with down-home flavor and it's a wonderful addition to the holiday dessert table. The hard sauce is to die for - really! You can find the recipe
here.

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                   One Year Ago Today:                                                      Two Years Ago Today:
                       Apple Oat Muffins                                           Pumpkin Sage and Sausage Rigatoni


                Three Years Ago Today:                                                  Four Years Ago Today: 
            Pumpkin Butterscotch Fudge                                                     Clam Fritters

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Colcannon for All Hollow's Eve - Away A While Recipe Favorites



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...Back in the day, this was a perennial favorite on my Halloween table. Colcannon, a traditional Irish dish associated with Halloween, is made with potatoes and savoy cabbage and served with a well of butter in its center. It's simple and delicious and comes with folklore that's sure to please the curious or superstitious. The tale, as told to me, concerns the fate of unmarried women who would put the first and last spoonfuls of Halloween colcannon into a stocking and hang it on their doors. Their shared belief was that the first man who walked through the door would become their husband. Immigration statistics and the birth rate, all those years ago, lead me to believe this didn't work real well. Back then, the ingredients used to make colcannon could be found in any Irish country garden. The second bit of blarney revolved around the selection of a cabbage from that garden by a blindfolded, unmarried woman. The cabbage she selected would be used to make a colcannon into which a ring was hidden. Of course, the person who found the ring would be the next to marry. I must warn you that my recipe for colcannon uses classic ingredients but techniques that my grandmother would frown upon. There are two or three steps to assembling any colcannon. The meat, if used, should be cooked before the potatoes and the cabbage are started. I use a slab of bacon to make mine. Ham can also be used. I simmer it in water for about 45 minutes before dicing it. My potatoes are conventional enough, though I do steam rather than boil them. I prefer to cook my cabbage in a wok. It's the easiest way I know to assure crisp tender greens that aren't water logged. When it all is assembled it looks like a traditional colcannon, but there will be a hint of smoke to play against crisp cabbage. The recipe can be found here.

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                   One Year Ago Today:                                                      Two Years Ago Today:
          Crock Pot Chinese Hacked Pork                                           Day of the Dead Bread



             Three Years Ago Today:                                                                Four Years Ago Today: 
   Pumpkin and Cinnamon Squares                                                  Roasted Pepper and Tomato Soup

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Braised Pork with Cream and Cabbage - Away A While Recipe Favorites



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...I am what I eat, but is that all that I am? I'm passionate about many things, consumed by some and totally repulsed by others. I'm intense and commit totally or not at all. My Dad - first coach and cheerleader - would watch my antics, shake his heads and murmur to me and an invisible assembly, "Thank God, you're not a missionary!" I garden with the same intensity as I cook and that's how it happened that I was up to my knees in mulch on a wet, chilly Oregon day last week. It wasn't the bitter cold of winter, but rather a creeping, damp that chills the bone and afflicts serious gardeners wherever they may be. Soup and stew help ward it off, but there was no time to make either. I culled from memory a recipe - a golden oldie - that would provide warmth and comfort in a bit less than an hour. I'd forgotten how satisfying pork cooked in this manner can be. You'll need some bacon, pork chops, cabbage, wine and cream to pull it off. Then let imagination carry you to a French farmhouse kitchen with a roaring fire and bottle of vin rouge on the table. Grab a glass and pour. The recipe comes from the mountainous Auvergne region of France which is famous for rustic pork dishes such as this one. You can find the recipe, here.

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                   One Year Ago Today:                                                      Two Years Ago Today:
  Fresh Apple Bread with Caramel Glaze                                    Pumpkin Bread Pudding



          Three Years Ago Today:                                                             Four Years Ago Today: 
                     Soul Cakes                                                                    Chocolate Peanut Snowballs

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